Breach of Protection Order

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What happens when a protection order is breached?

Additional order

Where a person against whom a personal protection order (PPO) or expedited order (EO) has been made contravenes the order (such as by committing violence against the complainant), it is possible for the Court to give one or more additional orders, such as a domestic exclusion order and/ or a counselling order.

A DEO gives the protected person the right of exclusive occupation of the shared residence or a specified part of the shared residence. For instance, your spouse/ the family member against whom a protection order is made, may be restricted from entering your common home or your bedroom, even though he/ she is a joint owner of your home.

Offence – breach of protection order

Where a person wilfully contravenes a protection order (PPO/ EO/ DEO), there is a possibility that he/ she may be guilty of an offence. If he/ she is found guilty, he/ she shall be liable to a fine of not more than $2,000 or to an imprisonment term of 6 months or less, or both.

Repeat offenders are liable to a fine of not more than $5,000 or to an imprisonment term of not more than 12 months, or both.

Family violence is viewed very seriously in Singapore.

Fresh offence

It should be noted that the person who breaches the protection order may also be charged for offences from the fresh acts of violence. For instance, if a husband who already has a protection order made against him assaults his wife, it is possible for him to be charged for (1) breaching the protection order and (2) the offence of voluntarily causing hurt under the Penal Code.

The consequences are serious.

See: Section 65 of Women’s Charter (Singapore)

Your family lawyer can assist by:

1. Advising you on what constitutes a breach of your protection order or the protection order that was made against you.

2. Advising you on your rights.

3. Representing you in all related Court proceedings.

You may also be interested to read more about:

1. Divorce and Separation

2. Annulment (Nullity) of Marriage

3. Children’s Issues

4. Matrimonial Assets

5. Maintenance Issues (Alimony)

6. Family Violence