Illegitimate Child Law Singapore- Can single mothers request for child maintenance?

As a family lawyer in Singapore, I do not just handle divorce cases. For instance, I have many clients who are never married. They are always keen to find out more about what they call illegitimate child law Singapore. I represent both complainants (single mothers) and respondents (fathers).

Illegitimate Child Law Singapore

If you are a single mother in Singapore, you may wish to apply for child maintenance from your child’s biological father.

You can do so, even if your child is “illegitimate”.

See: Sections 68 to 71 of the Women’s Charter Singapore

To kick start the process, you should bring along a copy of your child’s birth certificate and your NRIC to the Family Court. You need to fill up an application form and pay a small fee for the maintenance summons to be issued to your child’s father.

After the issuance of the summons, you will go through a mediation process with your child’s father. In the best case scenario, you will reach an amicable resolution with the child’s father on the issue of the child’s maintenance through this process.

Should you be unable to reach an amicable settlement, you should consider engaging a lawyer to represent you in further Court proceedings.

Receiving financial support is the right of every child, legitimate or otherwise. Even in developed economies around the world, child poverty is a social issue. Many of these children are from households of single mothers. For instance, in Japan, many single mothers do not receive maintenance for their children. The average annual household income of single mothers is approximately S$36,000 in 2010. This is less than 50% of the average household income for Japanese households with children.

See: “Japanese support groups lend hand to single mothers”, Today, 24 June 2017

If you need more information on illegitimate child law Singapore, we are here to offer our support. Contact us today!

You may also be interested to read more about:

1. Divorce and Separation

2. Annulment (Nullity) of Marriage

3. Children’s Issues

4. Matrimonial Assets

5. Maintenance Issues (Alimony)

6. Family Violence

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