Can Single Mother Get Baby Bonus?

Can single mother get baby bonus?

Many people assume that as a family lawyer in Singapore, I deal only with divorces, separation and annulments. While divorce, separation and annulment cases make up the bulk of my work, I am also concerned about the well-being of my clients.

As a family lawyer Singapore, I am concerned about the well-being of my clients and I try to provide as much assistance as possible, sometimes outside my work as a lawyer.

I have many clients who are single mothers. A common question is: can single mother get baby bonus?

The Ministry of Social and Family Development made this clear recently in a letter to The Straits Times Forum page.

The baby bonus is only for those who have children in a marriage.

Can single mother get baby bonus? The answer is no.

In addition, an unwed parent will not receive housing benefits even if the biological father/ mother adopts the child who is born out of wedlock (before marriage).

MSF had sent the letter in response to the queries of Straits Times readers and the Association of Women for Action and Research (Aware).

On the other hand, all Singaporean children enjoy the following benefits even if their parents are not married:

  1. Medisave grant for newborns;
  2. Infant care;
  3. Childcare subsidies;
  4. Maid levy concession;
  5. Child Development Account (CDA) benefits; and
  6. Government paid maternity leave.

See: Koh Xing Hui, “No housing benefits if unwed parent adopts child”, The Straits Times, 26 May 2017

It is important to note that an illegitimate child can seek maintenance from his/ her biological father. However, if an unwed mother decides to adopt the child, the adoption will end the father-child relationship and the child will not be able to seek maintenance from his/ her biological father.

Contact us today if you have more questions on what you can do for a child born out of wedlock!

You may also be interested to read more about:

1. Divorce and Separation

2. Annulment (Nullity) of Marriage

3. Children’s Issues

4. Matrimonial Assets

5. Maintenance Issues (Alimony)

6. Family Violence

 

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